Freud Standard Edition (1915)

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By Alan Rowan

« … let us state at the very outset that the repressed does not cover everything that is unconscious »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition 14, p.166.

« An instinct can never become an object of consciousness – only the idea that represents the instinct can. Even in the unconscious, moreover, an instinct cannot be represented otherwise than by an idea »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition 14, p.177.

« … there are no unconscious affects as there are unconscious ideas. The whole difference arises from the fact that ideas are cathexes – basically of memory-traces – whilst affects and emotions correspond to process of discharge, the final manifestation of which are received as feelings »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition 14, p.178.

« The Ucs. processes pay just as little regard to reality. They are subject to the pleasure principle; their fate depends only on how strong they are and on whether they fulfil the demands of the pleasure-unpleasure regulation. »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition 14, p.187.

« To sum up: exemption from mutual contradiction, primary process (mobility of cathexes), timelessness, and replacement of external by psychical reality – these are the characteristics which we may expect to find in processes belonging to the system Ucs. »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition,14, p.187.

« Now, too, we are in a position to state precisely what it is that repression denies to the rejected presentation in the transference neuroses; what it denies to the presentation is translation into words which shall remain attached to the object. A presentation which is not put into words, or a psychical act which is not hypercathected, remains thereafter in the Ucs. in a state of repression. »

Sigmund FREUD. ((1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition, 14, p.202.

« …psycho-analytic treatment is based upon an influencing of the Ucs from the direction of the Cs., and at any rate shows that this, though a laborious task, is not impossible…[but] is a difficult and slow process.  »

Sigmund FREUD. (1915). The Unconscious. Standard Edition 14, p.194.